Sanctions against apartheid were effective

BMJ 1995; 311 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.311.7011.1025c (Published 14 October 1995)
Cite this as: BMJ 1995;311:1025.4

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  1. Raymond Hoffenberg
  1. Professor of medical ethics PO Box 129, Royal Brisbane Hospital, University of Queensland, Queensland 4029, Australia

    EDITOR,--Ralph Crawshaw has taken advantage of a book review to offer a diatribe about the sanctions applied to South Africa in the days of apartheid.1 In general, sanctions are regarded as an acceptable and at times effective instrument to bring about change, hence their application against Iraq, against Shell in the fiasco over the Brent Spar oil rig, and currently by many countries against France for continued nuclear testing. It is almost universally agreed that sanctions …

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