Education And Debate

ABC of Medical Computing: AN INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING IN MEDICAL PRACTICE

BMJ 1995; 310 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.310.6995.1650 (Published 24 June 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;310:1650
  1. Nicholas Lee,
  2. Andrew Millman

    The past decade has seen an explosive growth in the number of computers, and in Britain alone there are now over 10 million in use. The capability of computers has also increased so that today's desktop PC is far more powerful than older main frame computers. This breathtaking pace of change has inevitably left many people behind. It is extraordinary that, despite the fact that information technology is now taught in every school, only a minority of current medical students consider themselves computer literate. The proportion of practising doctors who are able to get the best out of a computer is even smaller. We hope to remove some of the mystique from computing and to share our confidence that the technology can easily be mastered.

    Modern desktop PC.

    **FIGURE OMITTED**

    What do computers have to offer?

    The commonest reason for buying a computer is the need to write simple letters, medical reports, papers, and curriculum vitae using a word processor. Most modern word processors are, however, capable of handling far more than simple text. You can create and incorporate colourful …

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