Medicine And The Media

An everyday story of ICU folk

BMJ 1995; 310 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.310.6994.1612a (Published 17 June 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;310:1612
  1. Graham Baldock

    In many ways intensive care flies in the face of the current philosophy of health care delivery. It provides expensive rescue care to a small number of people, of whom a substantial minority do not benefit, with minimal impact on the health of communities; and evidence to support many of the treatments given is lacking. Every day those working in intensive care units face head on the results of the tension between changing demography, advancing technology, and limited resources. Given the importance ascribed to involving the public in decisions over priorities in health care, it is important that television programmes on health matters convey the issues entailed in ways that are easily understood yet do not oversimplify or trivialise them. How does the series Intensive Care succeed?

    The choice of setting—the adult intensive …

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