Medicine And Books

The Paradox of Progress

BMJ 1995; 310 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.310.6991.1418 (Published 27 May 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;310:1418
  1. Douglas Carnall

    James Willis Radcliffe, pounds sterling15.50, pp 136 ISBN 1 85775 063 2

    Not everything that can be counted, counts; and not everything that counts can be counted. Sir George Pickering's splendid epigram apparently graced Einstein's wall, and it is a good summary of the spirit of James Willis's personal and anecdotal foray into the philosophy of holism. The ideas in The Paradox of Progress are deceptively simple: our minds are much larger than we can ever imagine, we cannot quantify the contents of our memories. The illusion that the important things in life are quantifiable is just that: an illusion, which …

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