Medicine And The Media

Internal conflict

BMJ 1995; 310 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.310.6984.946 (Published 08 April 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;310:946
  1. R H T Ward

    In “Fetal Attraction” the scene was set with a group of women comparing notes about the disagreeable aspects of their pregnancies, mostly morning sickness, the dislike of drinking tea, and even of a shower (“The water smells of onions”), and finally a woman who pronounced the whole experience as “horrible.” It was a relief to see the same women laughing and enjoying themselves later in the programme, one even admitting that she was having a “good pregnancy”; but Cambridge pathologist Dr Charles Loke's dramatic description of the human as having the most invasive placenta in the mammalian kingdom (eating into the maternal tissues like a cancer) established human reproduction as a …

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