Medicopolitical Digest

Thames regions take over London initiativeLondoners call for independent inquiry into health crisisGovernment refuses to meet students on loansMedical education funding to be reviewedBMA offers to meet ministers over government feesBMA's 1995 annual meeting

BMJ 1995; 310 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.310.6979.604 (Published 04 March 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;310:604
  1. Linda Beecham

    Thames regions take over London initiative

    At the end of March the London Implementation Group will formally hand over responsibility for carrying forward the objectives in Making London Better to North and South Thames Regional Health Authorities.1 Making London Better was the government's response to Sir Bernard Tomlinson's 1992 inquiry into London's health service and the London Implementation Group was set up as a task force for a time limited purpose as part of the NHS Executive to provide the impetus for change.2

    In a letter to regional directors and chairmen of district health authorities and trusts in the London Initiative Zone the minister for health, Mr Gerald Malone, says that the structure of London's health service is much simpler than when the group was first set up. Almost all the providers will be trusts by 1 April and health authorities have been brought together into seven commissioning agencies. By the same date a quarter of the population in London will be in fundholding practices.

    The London Implementation Group has formed alliances with the voluntary and independent sectors to raise the profile of primary care, and the Primary Health Care Forum, which has advised the group on development plans for primary and community care developments in London, will continue under the chairman ship of Sir William Staveley, who is chairman of the North Thames RHA.

    Mr Malone said that …

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