Letters

Audit of doctors and patients' views may help

BMJ 1995; 310 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.310.6978.528 (Published 25 February 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;310:528
  1. Gifford Batstone,
  2. Mary Edwards,
  3. Patrick Jeffrey,
  4. Dominique Freire,
  5. Penny Morris,
  6. Frances Sheldon
  1. Consultant chemical pathologist Salisbury District Hospital, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP2 8BJ
  2. Clinical audit/effectiveness coordinator South and West Regional Health Authority, Bristol BS2 8EF
  3. Consultant surgeon West Dorset General Hospitals NHS Trust, Weymouth and District Hospital, Weymouth, Dorset DT4 7TB
  4. Project manager College of Health, London E2 9PL
  5. Communication and curriculum facilitator Cambridge University Clinical School, Addenbrooke's NHS Trust, Cambridge CB2 2SP
  6. Macmillan lecturer in psychosocial palliative care Department of Social Work Studies, Southampton University, Southampton SO17 1BJ

    EDITOR,—D J Weatherall's comments on the interpersonal skills of clinical staff highlight how good communication enhances clinical effectiveness.1 This has been shown by several studies.2 3 While communication skills are increasingly being included in undergraduate courses and postgraduate training in general practice and psychiatry, for example, there remain the questions of how communication between a clinician and a patient may be assessed and improved for established health care professionals and how the patient might have a direct …

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