Medicopolitical Digest

Review body recommends 2.5% increaseGeneral practitioners will decide where to visit patientsGeneral Medical Council proposes increase in lay membershipMedical deans to manage registrar trainingEuropean Union undermines medical advisory committeeRoyal college calls for changes to general practice training

BMJ 1995; 310 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.310.6977.471 (Published 18 February 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;310:471

The 1995 report of the Doctors' and Dentists' Review Body has recommended a 2.5% increase for salaried doctors in the NHS and a 3% increase for general practitioners from 1 April (p 419).

The recommended increases in general practitioners' fees will be announced later.

The value and number of distinction awards for consultants has increased: A+ to pounds sterling49 820 (up seven to 250); A to pounds sterling36 710 (up 23 to 861); B to pounds sterling20 975 (up 45 to 1910); and C to pounds sterling10 490 (up 100 to 4377).

Examples of some of the increases are set out below.

View this table:

Doctors in the hospital service and in public and community health

General practitioners will decide where to visit patients

General practitioners' terms of service have been amended to make clear that they will be responsible for judging whether or not a patient consultation should take place and when and where it should take place. In the past doctors have felt obliged to visit patients in their homes if a home visit was requested and this has contributed to the increase in out of hours calls. Now they will be able to decide whether to give advice by telephone, whether to see patients at the surgery, in some other clinical setting, or in the patient's home or whether to recommend a direct referral to hospital. The alternative premises must be approved by the family health services authority (FHSA) and patients must be told where the premises are. They must be “proper and sufficient” and …

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