Letters

Authors' reply

BMJ 1995; 310 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.310.6977.466a (Published 18 February 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;310:466
  1. John McMurray,
  2. Andrew Rankin
  1. Consultant Department of Cardiology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU
  2. Senior lecturer University Department of Medical Cardiology, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow C31 2ER

    EDITOR,—We agree with the principle of John Rawles's point. If every patient could receive thrombolysis immediately at the onset of myocardial infarction the potential number of lives saved would be enormous. The difficulty is calculating the likely benefit in the more typical situation of trying to give thrombolysis perhaps an hour earlier than usual. Rawles's approach to this calculation is interesting. We believe, however, that drawing a line of best fit might not be the best way of getting a true estimate of the likely typical benefit of early treatment. …

    View Full Text

    Sign in

    Log in through your institution

    Free trial

    Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
    Sign up for a free trial

    Subscribe