Medicine And Books

The Environmental Protection Agency: Asking the Wrong Questions. From Nixon to Clinton

BMJ 1995; 310 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.310.6972.136d (Published 14 January 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;310:136
  1. Michael Mccally

    Marc K Landy, Marc J Roberts, Stephen R Thomas Oxford University Press, pp 341 ISBN 0 19 508673 2

    In the United States conservation initiatives for protecting species and open spaces were superseded in the 1960s by environmentalism, a fusion of scientific rationalism and political activism that has relied on legislation and legal challenge in the courts to promote environmental protection. The environmental movement's first focus was industrial pollution, and its founding document was Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, an examination of the threats to the environment and human health posed by unregulated industry.

    In the 1970s the US Congress responded with surprising speed to concern over deterioration of the environment and produced far reaching environmental legislation. The National Environmental Policy Act of 1970 requires the federal government to disclose the environmental consequences of its activities as “environmental …

    View Full Text

    Sign in

    Log in through your institution

    Free trial

    Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
    Sign up for a free trial

    Subscribe