Letters

Future of inpatient adolescent psychiatric units

BMJ 1994; 309 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.309.6966.1438 (Published 26 November 1994) Cite this as: BMJ 1994;309:1438
  1. Chris Hollis
  1. Medical Research Council training fellow, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, London SE5 8AF.
  2. Medical Research Council training fellow, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, London SE5 8AF.

    NHS reforms address existing deficiencies

    1. Chris Hollis
    1. Medical Research Council training fellow, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, London SE5 8AF.
    2. Medical Research Council training fellow, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, London SE5 8AF.

      EDITOR,—Harold Behr and Matthew Hodes are right to be concerned about the future of inpatient adolescent psychiatric units,1 but I believe that they are mistaken to cite the purchaser-provider split as the cause of the problem. The NHS reforms have simply highlighted longstanding deficiencies in the service offered by some inpatient adolescent units.

      In 1986 the Health Advisory Service's report Bridges Over Troubled Waters described how in many parts of Britain difficulties had arisen as a result of …

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