Letters

Tuberculosis and slim disease in Africa

BMJ 1994; 309 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.309.6963.1230b (Published 05 November 1994) Cite this as: BMJ 1994;309:1230
  1. P Godrey-Faussett,
  2. A Mwinga,
  3. M Hosp,
  4. R Baggaley,
  5. J Porter,
  6. R Msiska
  1. Zambart Project, Department of Medicine, University Teaching Hospital, PO Box 50110, Lusaka, Zambia Kara Counselling and Training Trust, Lusaka Department of Clinical Sciences, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London National AIDS, STD, and TB Prevention and Control Programme, Ministry of Health, Lusaka

    EDITOR, - S B Lucas and colleagues found that tuberculosis was associated with the wasting that is characteristic of so many deaths related to HIV infection in Africa.1 They conclude that the aim should be prophylaxis or earlier diagnosis and treatment.

    Preventive treatment for tuberculosis in Africa continues to excite controversy. The International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases and the World Health Organisation issued a joint statement in October 1993 which recommended “isoniazid preventive therapy for individuals with both tuberculosis and HIV infections.”2 Meanwhile, in December 1993, one of the final recommendations of the African regional meeting of the international union was that “Preventive …

    View Full Text

    Sign in

    Log in through your institution

    Free trial

    Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
    Sign up for a free trial

    Subscribe