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The bottom line is a moral one

BMJ 1994; 309 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.309.6947.78a (Published 09 July 1994) Cite this as: BMJ 1994;309:78
  1. Jane Smith

    With some help from the Bishop of Birmingham Britain's doctors looked this week as if they had found just the right tone to strike in their continuing debate with the government over the reformed National Health Service.

    In his sermon on Sunday to doctors gathering in Birmingham for the BMA's annual representative meeting the bishop, the Right Reverend Mark Santer, talked about the moral values embodied in institutions. He spoke of the achievements of the NHS in its first 46 years—and the fact that they were related to avowedly moral ideals: health care for all and equality of access. The NHS, he said, “has promoted and embodied a culture of generous service and unstinting care which continues to astonish those who receive it.”

    He contrasted this with the current business model of the internal market …

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