Minerva

Minerva

BMJ 1994; 308 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.308.6936.1112 (Published 23 April 1994) Cite this as: BMJ 1994;308:1112

Since 1980 hospitals in England and Wales have reported 218 cases of nosocomially acquired legionnaires' disease, with 68 deaths (Epidemiology and Infection 1994;112:329-45). One third of the cases were single, sporadic events: nevertheless, the report concludes that even a single nosocomial case should evoke immediate investigation, as should any finding of legionella organisms in hospital water systems.

The mother of two infants who died more than 20 years ago with a diagnosis of the sudden infant death syndrome has been charged with their murder, says a report in “Science” (1994;264:197). In 1972 the deaths were written up in an article in “Pediatrics” which argued that multiple cases in one family indicated an inborn abnormality producing apnoea. The author of the paper remains convinced that the deaths were natural, but other paediatricians disagree - hence the legal action.

All women know that after having a baby they may become depressed - baby blues - but it is less well known that some women become elated and hypomanic (British Journal of Psychiatry 1994;164:517-21). A study of 558 women found that a tenth showed features of hypomania and that a high score …

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