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Focus: Edinburgh: The media: help or hindrance to medicine?

BMJ 1994; 308 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.308.6935.1002a (Published 16 April 1994) Cite this as: BMJ 1994;308:1002
  1. L Beecham

    Opinion polls continue to rate doctors right at the top in the eyes of the public, way above estate agents and car salesmen and also above journalists. But how much does the medical profession owe to the media in maintaining this position and how have relations between the two changed? While agreeing that newspapers, television, and the radio now played a much greater role in reporting medical stories, speakers at the recent meeting of the BMA's Junior Members Forum in Edinburgh had different answers influenced by their jobs or personal experience.

    Some doctors now feel that they are being tried by the media and with health considered more as a commodity more medical decisions are being questioned. This is the view of Dr Jonathan Gabe, a senior research fellow at Royal Holloway University, London. The patient's charter has encouraged more people to complain and litigation has increased. He doesn't think …

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