Research Article

Coronary arteriography in a district general hospital: feasibility, safety, and diagnostic accuracy.

BMJ 1990; 300 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.300.6727.777 (Published 24 March 1990) Cite this as: BMJ 1990;300:777
  1. K Ranjadayalan,
  2. P G Mills,
  3. D C Sprigings,
  4. K Mourad,
  5. P Magee,
  6. A D Timmis
  1. Department of Cardiology, Newham General Hospital, London.

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the feasibility, safety, and diagnostic accuracy of coronary arteriography in the radiology department of a district general hospital using conventional fluoroscopy and videotape recording. DESIGN--Observational study of the feasibility and safety of coronary arteriography in a district general hospital and analysis of its diagnostic accuracy by prospective within patient comparison of the video recordings with cinearteriograms obtained in a catheter laboratory. SETTING--Radiology department of a district general hospital and the catheter laboratory of a cardiological referral centre. SUBJECTS--50 Patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with streptokinase who underwent coronary arteriography in a district general hospital three (two to five) days after admission. 45 Of these patients had repeat coronary arteriography after four (three to seven) days in the catheter laboratory of a cardiological referral centre. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Incidence of complications associated with catheterisation and the sensitivity and specificity of video recordings in the district general hospital (judged by two experienced observers) for identifying the location and severity of coronary stenoses. RESULTS--Coronary arteriograms recorded on videotape in the district general hospital were obtained in 47 cases and apart from one episode of ventricular fibrilation (treated successfully by cardioversion) there were no complications of the procedure. 45 Patients were transferred for investigation in the catheter laboratory, providing 45 paired coronary arteriograms recorded on videotape and cine film. The specificity of the video recordings for identifying the location and severity of coronary stenoses was over 90%. Sensitivity, however, was lower and for one observer fell below 40% for lesions in the circumflex artery. A cardiothoracic surgeon judged that only nine of the 47 video recordings were adequate for assessing revascularisation requirements. CONCLUSIONS--Coronary arteriography in the radiology department of a district general hospital is safe and feasible. Nevertheless, the quality of image with conventional fluoroscopy and video film is inadequate and will need to be improved before coronary arteriography in this setting can be recommended.