Research Article

Immunoscintigraphy for detecting acute myocardial infarction without electrocardiographic changes.

BMJ 1990; 300 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.300.6718.151 (Published 20 January 1990) Cite this as: BMJ 1990;300:151

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  1. D Jain,
  2. A Lahiri,
  3. E B Raftery
  1. Department of Cardiology, Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow.

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether immunoscintigraphy with antibody to myosin may detect acute myocardial infarction without electrocardiographic changes. DESIGN--Prospective study of patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina with cardiac imaging with 111indium myosin antibody, estimation of cardiac enzyme concentrations, electrocardiography, 201thallium imaging, and radionuclide ventriculography. SETTING--Coronary care unit in a district general hospital. PATIENTS--119 Consecutive patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina. Patients with cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, valvular heart disease, myocardial infarction or cardiac surgery in the previous two weeks or with left bundle branch block and women of childbearing age were excluded. RESULTS--Of 75 patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction, seven had no diagnostic electrocardiographic changes despite normal conduction patterns. Immunoscintigraphy with myosin antibody disclosed necrosis in all seven patients, which was localised in regions supplied by diseased coronary arteries in all but one. Six patients had abnormal images on 201thallium imaging, and all seven had abnormal wall motion at the site of antibody uptake. One patient with minimal left main stem and right coronary artery atheroma had uptake of antibody at two discrete sites. CONCLUSIONS--Immunoscintigraphy with antibody to myosin confirms myocardial infarction in the absence of electrocardiographic changes and discloses the site of infarction.