Medical Practice

Workshop for Disabled Survivors of Severe Head Injury

Br Med J 1973; 3 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.3.5876.393 (Published 18 August 1973) Cite this as: Br Med J 1973;3:393
  1. P. S. London

    Abstract

    Existing services for the disabled do not cater for the needs of lame-brain survivors of severe head injury who may be capable of productive work though they may never become employable. A grant from the Nuffield Provincial Hospitals Trust made it possible to set up in 1967 a special workshop in premises provided by the regional hospital board. The hospital management committee assumed financial responsibility for the centre after three years, and after five years the Department of Health and Social Security purchased adjoining premises, which will double the present accommodation for about 35 persons. Though 45% of the 101 patients attending the workshop have returned to work, no financial support has yet been received from the Department of Employment. A suitably staffed hostel is needed for patients who live too far away to travel daily to and from the workshop. This undertaking has shown a need for special facilities for some of the victims of severe head injury, who differ in many important ways from other disabled persons.

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