Practice Observed

Uptake of immunisation in district health authorities in England

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1988; 296 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.296.6639.1775 (Published 25 June 1988) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1988;296:1775
  1. Brian Jarman,
  2. Nick Bosanquet,
  3. Peter Rice,
  4. Nicola Dollimore,
  5. Brenda Leese

    Abstract

    The uptakes of immunisation in the district health authorities in England were studied for the years 1983-5. Multiple regression analysis showed that the factors significantly associated with a low uptake of immunisation were mainly related to social conditions, particularly overcrowding of households and population density. Of the service factors, high proportions of elderly and singlehanded general practitioners and high average list sizes were also associated with a low uptake of immunisation in some of the analyses.

    The results suggest that the measures outlined in the government's white paper on improving primary health care services are likely to lead to improved uptakes of immunisation. If, however, the uptakes of immunisation are used as a measure of standards of the services provided they should first be adjusted to control for variations in social conditions, and the quality of vaccination data would have to be improved.