Research Article

Imaging thrombus with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody to platelets.

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1986; 293 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.293.6561.1525 (Published 13 December 1986) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1986;293:1525
  1. A M Peters,
  2. J P Lavender,
  3. S G Needham,
  4. I Loutfi,
  5. D Snook,
  6. A A Epenetos,
  7. P Lumley,
  8. R J Keery,
  9. N Hogg

    Abstract

    Indium-111-hydroxyquinoline labelled platelets, though useful in the detection of thrombus, have not gained widespread use owing to the time and technical skill required for their preparation. A study was therefore conducted evaluating a new method of imaging thrombus with platelets radiolabelled with a 111In labelled monoclonal antibody, P256, directed to the platelet surface glycoprotein complex IIb/IIIa. When the number of receptors occupied by P256 was less than 3% of the total available on the platelet surface platelet function, as assessed by platelet aggregometry, was undisturbed. P256 was radiolabelled with 111In using diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, which achieved a specific activity of 185 MBq (5 mCi)/mg. No impairment of immunoreactivity was detected at this specific activity. Platelets were labelled with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in vitro in two patients at a receptor occupancy of 6% and in vivo--that is, by direct intravenous injection of P256--in six patients at a receptor occupancy of 1%. In vivo recovery and biodistribution kinetics suggested that after in vitro labelling platelets were minimally activated. The 111In kinetics recorded after intravenous P256 suggested rapid and efficient radiolabelling of platelets and gave no indication of platelet activation. Of the six patients who received intravenous P256, three had documented thrombus, two of whom gave positive results on P256 platelet scintigraphy. The third subject had chronic deep venous thrombosis and was scintigraphically negative. Imaging thrombus using a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody directed to platelets appears to offer great potential as a simple, non-invasive approach to the diagnosis of thrombosis.