Research Article

Plasma cholesterol concentration and death from coronary heart disease: 10 year results of the Whitehall study.

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1986; 293 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.293.6542.306 (Published 02 August 1986) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1986;293:306
  1. G Rose,
  2. M Shipley

    Abstract

    Ten year mortality from coronary heart disease in 17,718 middle aged men was related to their initial plasma cholesterol concentrations. The relative risk of death from coronary heart disease declined with age, but the absolute excess risk did not. The risk gradient was continuous over the whole range of cholesterol concentrations, the lowest mortality being among men with concentrations below the lowest decile. It seems that, as with blood pressure, the average cholesterol concentration in the blood pressure, the average cholesterol concentration in the population is too high: lowest concentrations are prognostically the best. A quarter of all deaths from coronary heart disease related to cholesterol occurred among men with concentrations above the top decile, but 55% occurred among men with concentrations in the middle three fifths of the distribution; this figure of 55% could be reduced only by a policy aimed at lowering concentrations in the whole population.