Research Article

Renal transplantation in patients treated with haemodialysis and short term and long term continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1985; 291 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.291.6501.1004 (Published 12 October 1985) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1985;291:1004
  1. J B Evangelista Jr,
  2. D Bennett-Jones,
  3. J S Cameron,
  4. C Ogg,
  5. D G Williams,
  6. D H Taube,
  7. G Neild,
  8. C Rudge

    Abstract

    Forty two adult patients who had been treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for one to 142 weeks (mean (SD) 38 (36)) received a total of 44 allografted kidneys. Twenty one had been treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for less than 26 weeks (mean 11 (8)) and the other 21 for longer than 26 weeks (mean 64 (35)). These two groups were compared with 55 patients who had been treated with haemodialysis and received a total of 63 grafts. In the group of patients treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis azathioprine and low dose prednisolone were used as the immunosuppressive regimen for 20 transplantations in 18 patients, and 24 patients receiving 24 grafts were treated with cyclosporin A and low dose prednisolone. In the group of patients treated with haemodialysis 38 patients receiving 43 grafts were treated with azathioprine and low dose prednisolone, and 20 patients receiving 20 grafts were treated with cyclosporin A and low dose prednisolone. Actuarial survival of patients and grafts at two years was 95% and 72%, respectively, in the continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis group compared with 89% and 58%, respectively, in the haemodialysis group. No difference was found in graft survival between short term treatment with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (72% graft survival) and long term treatment (65% graft survival). In conclusion, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is suitable treatment for patients awaiting renal transplantation.