Research Article

Two different mechanisms in patients with venous thrombosis and defective fibrinolysis: low concentration of plasminogen activator or increased concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor.

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1985; 290 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.290.6480.1453 (Published 18 May 1985) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1985;290:1453
  1. I M Nilsson,
  2. H Ljungnér,
  3. L Tengborn

    Abstract

    Fibrinolytic components after venous occlusion and concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor were studied in 100 consecutive patients with confirmed recurrent deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. After 20 minutes of venous occlusion the fibrinolytic response was decreased in 33 patients, as measured both amidolytically with S-2251 and on fibrin plates. Two different mechanisms responsible for the poor fibrinolytic response could be distinguished. Twenty two of the patients in whom the response was poor released normal amounts of tissue plasminogen activator antigen, as assayed by immunoradiometric assay, but had appreciably increased concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor. The 11 other patients in whom the response was poor had both low tissue plasminogen activator activities and low tissue plasminogen activator antigen concentrations but normal concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor. The results show not only that defective synthesis or release of tissue plasminogen activator may be important in the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis but also that a large group of patients with thrombosis have an increased concentration of the inhibitor to tissue plasminogen activator.