Research Article

The Tayside infant morbidity and mortality study: effect on health of using gas for cooking.

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1985; 290 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.290.6473.957 (Published 30 March 1985) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1985;290:957
  1. S A Ogston,
  2. C D Florey,
  3. C H Walker

    Abstract

    The relation between respiratory illness and the use of gas for cooking was examined from data on 1565 infants born to mothers who were primigravidas living in Dundee in 1980. Episodes of, and admissions to hospital for, respiratory illness were recorded during the first year of life. Both admissions and episodes were more common in infants from families using gas for cooking or heating than in infants from families using any other type of cooking or heating, but the differences were not significant. Results from this and other studies show that there is probably a small relation between respiratory illness and the use of gas appliances without a flue. To show convincingly whether such a relation exists might require a survey of 18 000-23 000 subjects. Respiratory illness was, however, strongly and positively related to parental smoking, a finding that is often made even in small studies.