Research Article

Glycaemic control in diabetic nephropathy.

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1984; 288 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.288.6425.1187 (Published 21 April 1984) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1984;288:1187

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  1. J J Bending,
  2. J C Pickup,
  3. G C Viberti,
  4. H Keen

    Abstract

    To investigate the quality of glycaemic control that is achievable in diabetic patients with persistent proteinuria and asymptomatic but declining renal function three matched groups of patients were studied. The first comprised diabetics with proteinuria receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion; the second, diabetics without proteinuria receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion; and the third, diabetics with proteinuria receiving conventional insulin treatment. Glycaemic control in patients receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion was shown to be appreciably worse during the daytime in diabetics with proteinuria than in diabetics without proteinuria, although greatly superior to that in diabetics with proteinuria receiving conventional insulin treatment. The loss of glycaemic control in patients with proteinuria receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion probably occurred as a response to daytime hypoglycaemia and a consequent reduction in the proportion of the total insulin dose given prandially. Difficulty in controlling blood glucose concentrations may be a factor in the failure of intensified insulin regimens to influence the progression of diabetic renal disease.