Research Article

Correlation of persistently high serum amyloid A protein and C-reactive protein concentrations with rapid progression of secondary amyloidosis.

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1983; 286 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.286.6375.1391 (Published 30 April 1983) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1983;286:1391
  1. H M Falck,
  2. C P Maury,
  3. A M Teppo,
  4. O Wegelius

    Abstract

    The importance of serum amyloid A protein in the progression of renal failure was studied over three years in 28 patients with secondary (amyloid A type) amyloidosis predominantly due to rheumatoid arthritis. Creatinine clearance, the amount of protein in the urine, and serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein concentrations were determined regularly. Linear regression analysis showed a close correlation between the change in creatinine clearance each year and both serum amyloid A concentrations (20 patients: r= -0.83, p less than 0.001) and C-reactive protein concentrations (28 patients: r= -0.80, p less than 0.001). The correlation between serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein concentrations was also significant (317 parallel measurements: r=0.81, p less than 0.001). These findings suggest that monitoring serum amyloid A or C-reactive protein concentrations is valuable in assessing the prognosis in secondary amyloidosis and that therapeutic measures that lower serum amyloid A concentrations may reduce the formation of amyloid.