Research Article

Falling rate of provision of residential care for the elderly.

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1982; 284 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.284.6318.799 (Published 13 March 1982) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1982;284:799
  1. E Grundy,
  2. T Arie

    Abstract

    The rapid increase in the number of very aged people has not been accompanied by appropriate expansion of local authority residential facilities. The rate of provision in 1976 was already acknowledged to be inadequate, but data are now presented to show that since then there has been an effective fall in the rate of provision of some 9000 places equivalent to, say, 180 old people's homes of 50 places each. The prospects for the future are even gloomier: public spending cuts and local authority priorities suggest a continuing fall in the rate of provision that can be expected to have a profound effect on the National Health Service, on the burden on families, and on the condition in which old people are obliged to remain "in the community" (where support services have likewise failed to keep pace with demographic change).