Research Article

Rubella screening and immunisation of schoolgirls: results six to seven years after vaccination.

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1982; 284 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.284.6313.382 (Published 06 February 1982) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1982;284:382
  1. H Zealley,
  2. E Edmond

    Abstract

    A long term follow-up study was carried out of girls given RA27/3 or Cendehill rubella vaccine in their 13th-14th year compared with a group of girls who had been found to be naturally immune at the age. A high proportion of the girls in all groups had persistent rubella antibody six to seven years after inclusion in the study, although some of these would have been considered to be susceptible to rubella by methods currently in use for screening for rubella antibody. Great care should be taken in interpreting the efficiency of the schoolgirl immunisation policy in the United Kingdom; women in their childbearing years who may have received vaccine but are found by a screening test to be seronegative should be retested by a more sensitive procedure before a final report is made.