Research Article

Sister chromatid exchange induced by anti-herpes drugs.

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1981; 283 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.283.6295.817 (Published 26 September 1981) Cite this as: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1981;283:817
  1. J J Cassiman,
  2. E De Clercq,
  3. A S Jones,
  4. R T Walker,
  5. H Van den Berghe

    Abstract

    The rate of sister chromatid exchange induced by several anti-herpes agents was measured to assess their potential mutagenicity. The agents--5-iodo-deoxyuridine (IDU), 5-trifluoromethyl-deoxyuridine (TFT), and [E]-5-(2-bromovinyl)-deoxyuridine (BVDU)--were incubated at various concentrations with human lymphocytes and fibroblasts, and that rate of sister chromatid exchanges was measured. In lymphocytes and fibroblasts BVDU and IDU did not induce exchange except at concentrations of 50 mg/l, while TFT increased the rate of exchange at a concentration of 0.5 mg/l. The rate of sister chromatid exchange is a sensitive index of chromosomal damage, and these findings provide information on the safety of some of the antiherpes agents tested. TFT increased the rate of exchange at a concentration that coincides with its minimal antiviral concentration, but BVDU did not induce exchange at therapeutic concentrations.