Research Article

Long-term effects of physical training programme on risk factors for coronary heart disease in otherwise sedentary men.

Br Med J 1980; 281 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.281.6232.7 (Published 05 July 1980) Cite this as: Br Med J 1980;281:7
  1. A W Sedgwick,
  2. J R Brotherhood,
  3. A Harris-Davidson,
  4. R E Taplin,
  5. D W Thomas

    Abstract

    Three hundred and seventy sedentary men aged 20-65 years enrolled in a physical training programme after a medical and fitness examination that included measurements of "classical" risk factors for coronary heart disease. Five years later re-examination showed (a) that on average the subjects had not changed significantly in weight, blood pressure, serum lipid concentrations, smoking habits, and physical working capacity; (b) that men who had remained active and therefore had a higher degree of fitness did not differ in risk factors from men who had returned to sedentary habits; and (c) that men who had improved substantially in fitness did not differ in risk factors from men whose fitness had not changed or had declined. Five years after the initial programme one-third of the men were continuing with regular vigorous exercise. These results do not support the view that classical risk factors for coronary heart disease improve with increased physical activity and fitness.