Research Article

Vitamin D status in different subgroups of British Asians.

Br Med J 1976; 2 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.6048.1351 (Published 04 December 1976) Cite this as: Br Med J 1976;2:1351
  1. S P Hunt,
  2. J L O'Riordan,
  3. J Windo,
  4. A S Truswell

    Abstract

    To assess the effect of religious dietary practices and social customs on the vitamin D status of Asian immigrants, we kept records of the dietary intake and time spent out of doors of 81 Ugandan Asian men, women, and girls (9-19 years old). Sera were analysed for 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OHD3), and 28% of the subjects were found to have levels below the lower limit of normal. The (vegetarian) Hindus had the lowest dietary intakes, least time out of doors, and lowest serum 25-OHD3. The Goan (Roman Catholic) Asians, despite more pigmentation, had 25-OHD3 levels similar to those found among indigenous British people and had the most satisfactory vitamin D intakes. Among Asians, whose exposure to sunlight may be limited, dietary vitamin D becomes the major determinant of serum 25-OHD3.