Medical Practice

Infant-feeding Practices

Br Med J 1973; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.5869.762 (Published 30 June 1973) Cite this as: Br Med J 1973;2:762
  1. R. K. Oates

    Abstract

    A survey of mothers attending infant welfare clinics showed that 26% changed their infant's milk in the first two weeks after birth and that multiple changes were common. Twenty-two per cent. were preparing a milk formula more concentrated than the recommended strength by using either heaped or packed scoops instead of level scoops of powder or by giving extra scoops. The commonest age for starting solid feeding was between 3 and 4 weeks and the practice of adding rusk or cereal to the bottle was common. There are obvious dangers of hypernatraemia from taking concentrated milk feeds and problems of obesity which may follow the early introduction of cereals.

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