Research Article

Duodenal ulcer and working-class mobility in an African population in South Africa.

Br Med J 1978; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.6111.469 (Published 25 February 1978) Cite this as: Br Med J 1978;1:469
  1. I Segal,
  2. A A Dubb,
  3. L O Tim,
  4. A Solomon,
  5. M C Sottomayor,
  6. E M Zwane

    Abstract

    The number of Africans in Johannesburg presenting with duodenal ulcers has steadily increased over the past 50 years. The characteristics of 105 patients with duodenal ulcer who presented a Baragwanath Hospital were compared with those of matched and unmatched samples of patients without gastrointestinal conditions in the same hospital. Men with duodenal ulcers were found to be significantly better educated than their controls, most had been born in the town, and more of them were employed at higher, though not the highest, educational levels. These data were used to test Susser's proposition that duodenal ulcers are associated with "early urbanisation." Johannesburg blacks with duodenal ulcer did seem to fit the pattern, but the relation between stress and duodenal ulcer remains unclear.