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BMJ revenue sources

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  • BMJ revenue sources

BMJ revenue sources

BMJ receives revenue from a range of sources to ensure wide and affordable access to its products and services while maintaining high standards of quality and full editorial independence.

These sources of revenue are:

  • subscriptions from organisations and individuals
  • recruitment advertising
  • display advertising
  • reprints of journal articles
  • sponsorship from for-profit and not-for-profit organisations
  • delegate fees for conferences and “BMJ Masterclasses – live and virtual delegate fees for webinars and other forms of online training support.
  • events (exhibitor fees, sponsorship, and visitor fees)
  • sales of reprints, rights, and royalties
  • revenue for marketing services in the Learning and Quality divisions, often linked to licensing / commissioning contracts
  • syndication and license fees
  • author charges for open access articles in BMJ Journals (but not BMJ)
  • the BMA for free or discounted access to BMJ Learning for its members
  • unrestricted educational grants
  • commissioning fees for customised content
  • usage fees for hosting of BMJ content on other websites
  • fees for providing publishing services for products not owned by BMJ
  • student fees and royalties from post graduate qualifications

Separation is maintained between the editorial teams and the advertising and sponsorship sales teams. Where sponsorship has been obtained for any content or event, for example as the result of an unrestricted educational grant or for a sponsored symposium, or where customised content has been commissioned by an external agency, this is clearly indicated. 

BMJ believes that the sale of display advertising space is a legitimate source of revenue to support the publication of The BMJ, the specialist BMJ Journals, and other publications, both in print and online.

BMJ also believes that in well-defined circumstances, commercial sponsorship may support themed issues or supplements, subscriptions, seminars and conferences, as well as our international editions programme.

BMJ ’s policy on advertising and other commercial opportunities is detailed in this document and is based on the following principles and assumptions.

  1. BMJ sets high ethical standards in all its activities and above all defends the right to editorial independence. It does not allow advertising or sponsorship to influence in any way the decisions made on editorial content.

  2. Readers must immediately be able to tell what is advertising and what is editorial material.

  3. Readers understand that advertising is different from editorial material. They know that the claims made in advertising are not endorsed by BMJ.

  4. Advertising is the United Kingdom is now tightly regulated by British and European legislation and by the Advertising Standards Authority, the Prescriptions Medicines Code of Practice Authority, the Proprietary Authority of Great Britain, the Equal Opportunities Commission (EOC), and the Commission for Racial Equality (CRE).

  5. BMJ will carry advertisements that are “legal and decent and conform to current recommendations and guidelines

  6. Decisions on the positioning of advertisements are made independently of decisions made in the editorial departments on the content of a specific issue. The unlikely event of an advertisement for a product appearing next to an article about the same product will be entirely coincidental and should not be construed as anything else.

  7. As a medical publisher, BMJ occasionally needs to make special rules regarding the advertising of products considered harmful or potentially harmful to health. The rules relating to these products are detailed in this document.

  8. Advertisements are open to criticism just like any other material published in BMJ’s publications. BMJ publishes corrections to editorial material it does the same for advertisements.

  9. Editorial material will not be influenced by advertising. BMJ does not publish material to accompany advertising and does not sell advertising in relation to particular articles. BMJ’s advertising sales teams have no knowledge of particular articles that will appear in any BMJ publication. However, like the readers of BMJ’s publications, the advertising sales teams will sometimes know that The BMJ or other BMJ publications will be producing a theme issue on a particular subject or starting as a series of educational articles. The teams can then sell advertising on the general theme but cannot sell against a particular article.

  10. All decisions are at the discretion of the editor. If commercial clients adhere to these guidelines then their advertisement or sponsorship is likely to be accepted. Occasionally decisions may take time.

BMJ’s specialty journals’ sources of revenue

BMJ Journals receive revenue from a range of sources to ensure wide and affordable access while maintaining high standards of quality and full editorial independence. These are:

  • subscriptions from specialist societies, institutions and individuals
  • display advertising for pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical products
  • author charges for open access articles – Open access [http://journals.bmj.com/site/authors/editorial-policies.xhtml]
  • sale of article reprints
  • sale of rights and royalties
  • fees for providing publishing services for products not owned by BMJ.
  • sponsorship for supplements

Separation is maintained between the editorial team and the advertising and sponsorship sales team. Where sponsorship has been obtained for any content, for example as the result of an unrestricted educational grant, this is clearly indicated. 

BMJ Masterclasses sources of revenue

BMJ Masterclasses receive revenue from a range of sources to ensure that masterclasses remain affordable to delegates while maintaining high standards of quality and full editorial independence. These are:

  • delegate fees
  • exhibitors fees
  • commercially sponsored symposia

Separation is maintained between the editorial team and the advertising and sponsorship sales team. Sponsored symposia must meet the same editorial standards as the rest of the masterclass content and, although separate from the main programme, are always designed to be relevant and useful to the delegates. 

BMJ Learning sources of revenue

BMJ Learning receives income from a range of sources to ensure wide and affordable access while maintaining high standards of quality and full editorial independence. These are:

  • the BMA, for free access to BMA members
  • unrestricted educational grants for free access to other groups of users
  • fees for customised learning modules
  • pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical advertising

Separation is maintained between the editorial team and the advertising and sponsorship sales team. Where sponsorship has been obtained for any content, for example as the result of an unrestricted educational grant, or where content has been created under contract, this is clearly indicated. Advertising and sponsorship policy.

OnExamination sources of revenue

BMJ OnExamination receives income from a range of sources, to ensure wide and affordable access while maintaining high standards of quality and full editorial independence. These are:

  • subscriptions from institutions and individuals
  • commissioning fees for customised content
  • advertising and sponsorship

Separation is maintained between the editorial team and the advertising and sponsorship sales team. Where sponsorship has been obtained for any content, for example as the result of an unrestricted educational grant, or where content has been created under contract, this is clearly indicated. 

BMJ Evidence Centre sources of revenue

The BMJ Evidence Centre receives revenue from a range of sources, to ensure wide and affordable access while maintaining high standards of quality and full editorial independence. These are:

  • subscriptions from institutions and individuals
  • syndication and license fees
  • sale of rights and royalties
  • fees for commissioned evidence reports
  • usage fees for hosting of BMJ content on other websites
  • sponsorship and advertising

Separation is maintained between the editorial team and the advertising and sponsorship sales team. Where sponsorship has been obtained for any content, for example as the result of an unrestricted educational grant, or where content has been created under contract, this is clearly indicated. Advertising and sponsorship policy.

The BMJ’s sources of revenue

The BMJ receives revenue from a range of sources, to ensure wide and affordable access while maintaining high standards of quality and full editorial independence. These are:

  • subscriptions from institutions and individuals
  • recruitment advertising
  • display advertising for pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical products
  • events (exhibitions, sponsorship and visitor fees)
  • sale of reprints, rights and royalties
  • sponsorship

Separation is maintained between the editorial team and the advertising and sponsorship sales team. Where sponsorship has been obtained for any BMJ content, for example as a result of an unrestricted educational grant, this is clearly indicated. 

The BMJ is an open access research journal but does not currently charge author fees. The BMJ’s publishing model link [About The BMJ]

BMJ Careers Fairs’ sources of revenue

BMJ Careers Fairs receive revenue from a range of sources to ensure that they remain affordable to visitors while maintaining high standards of quality and full editorial independence. These are:

  • visitor fees
  • exhibitors fees
  • commercially sponsored seminars
  • advertisement income
  • sponsored distribution of visitor tickets

Separation is maintained between the seminar team and the exhibition, advertisement and sponsorship sales team. Sponsored seminars are permitted on topics determined by the sponsor and clear branding identifies which elements of the seminar programme include commercial content or have been commercially sponsored.